About

  “How can you write if you can’t cry.”

Ring Lardner

Gloria Hochman is an award-winning author, journalist, broadcaster and popular public speaker who writes “to hit a nerve.”  She wants her words to change the way people think, feel, behave and live their lives.

She has written three books including A Brilliant Madness:  Living with Manic-Depressive Illness which she co-authored with late actor Patty Duke.  The book was on The New York Times Best Sellers list for ten weeks.  Her most recent book, The Age for Change, which she edited and to which she contributed several chapters, was published online by Coming of Age, a project of Temple University’s Intergenerational Center,PBS/NPR station WHYY,  AARP, Pennsylvania and the United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania.   It explores issues facing baby boomers as they re-brand the vision of aging.

Ms. Hochman has published hundreds of articles for The Philadelphia Inquirer Magazine, where she continues to write for the newspaper’s Health and Science section; Newsweek; Ladies’ Home Journal; Psychology Today, Reader’s Digest and Science Digest. She has reviewed books for the The New York Times.

In late 2003, she and writer Anndee Hochman and Jennifer Miller co-authored “Foster Care: Voices from the Inside,” a seminal report on the US foster care system, published by the Pew Commission on Children in Foster Care. The paper was presented to Congressional hearings and disseminated to the media.

Ms. Hochman is an in-demand public speaker whose provocative subjects have included:

  • Who Is This Stranger:  Navigating New Waters with Your Adult Children
  • Who is My Mother:  Inside the Mind of an Adopted Child
  • When Should Children be Taken Away from Their Parents?
  • Is She Manic-Depressive or Just Plain Moody?
  • Adult Children of Divorce
  • Why Writers Write: What My Subjects Have Taught Me.

Ms. Hochman’s community activities include directing communications for the National Adoption Center, which expands adoption opportunities for children with special needs, and serving as deputy chair for WEAF, the Writers Emergency Assistance Fund sponsored by the American Society for Journalists and Authors. She is a frequent guest on radio and television programs focusing on child welfare, and each week is heard on CBS/ KYW Newsradio’s Wednesday’s Child show featuring a child waiting to be adopted.

She is an affiliate member of the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia, having completed a fellowship in psychodynamic therapy.

Her husband, Stan Hochman, the renowned sportswriter and broadcaster, passed away in April 2015.   Her daughter, Anndee Hochman, is  a writer, author and teacher of creative writing, memoir and poetry.